• GSA for HHS
    I believe a GSA Club is important and could benefit HHS, because in a small town in the "country" some people are brought up to not tolerate LGBT+. I want to let LGBT+ students unite with straight allies to end this problem within the school and give a safe place for all students to come and discuss the issues. This could also give a safe place for students who have not come out yet to build up the courage to be known as an LGBT+ student and feel safe being who they are.
    8 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Faith Brantley
  • Uphold Parkway Sex Ed
    In the Spring of 2016, the Parkway Board of Education voted to bring changes to the Sexual Education Curriculum to make it inclusive. But it is still under attack. The Parkway School Board now has a conservative majority. We must tell them that we NEED Sex Ed to keep us safe. Please sign to stand with Parkway Students.
    573 of 600 Signatures
    Created by Andrew Bennett Picture
  • CUSD: Gender-Neutral Dress Code
    The Clovis Unified School District's majority vote (4-3) refusing the adaptation of a gender-neutral dress code is illegal. Under the California Education Code (Ch. 2 Art. 3 Sec. 220), students are entitled to their right of not being subjected to "...discrimination on the basis of disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression...". Students, parents, and community members alike believe that the mindset during the implementation of the 1975 CUSD dress code does not reflect the mindset of 2016's society.
    3,790 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Rei B. Picture
  • Gender Equality for MHS
    Many student feel their gender doesn't categorize as male or female. These kids are often discriminated against or disregarded completely. This can create many issues for both the mental and physical health of the student. If we educate our school about non binary genders, it will help on the path to equality. Also, if we create a bathroom for non binary individuals, not only would it give them somewhere to use the restroom safely, it would create a better and more accepting environment in general.
    153 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Amber Gilson
  • North Carolina Students Need Solutions: Adopt Restorative Practices
    In November 2013, Jewlyes Gutierrez, a transgender girl from California, was outrageously charged with assault for defending herself against bullying at school. A year earlier, Dynasty Young in Indiana was expelled for bringing a stun gun to school in self-defense after enduring months of harassment based on his sexual orientation and gender expression. Jewlyes, Dynasty, LGBTQ youth, and all students deserve better. Our district can -- and must -- take action now to make sure our students are never put in a similar position. We often hear about bullying in schools, but the anti-bullying and zero tolerance policies adopted in response pose just as much of a danger for LGBTQ youth of color. Together, hostile school environments and extreme disciplinary policies create a school-to-prison pipeline for youth of color, youth with disabilities, and LGBTQ youth, telling them that their lives are disposable and that simply trying to get an education carries a risk of jail time. LGBTQ youth make up just 5-7% of the youth population, but represent 15% of those in the juvenile justice system. Exclusionary practices (like suspensions and expulsions) hurt all students' ability to succeed and achieve their academic goals and dreams. We believe restorative justice practices are the best solution for school discipline problems involving bias-based bullying and harassment, because they allow schools to address the root problems behind bullying and harmful behavior. In January, the Obama administration released guidelines for improving school climate and discipline. Those guidelines recommend best practices like restorative approaches and condemn punitive policies and court referrals. It has been proven that alternative discipline with non-punitive approaches provides better student outcomes and keeps the student community together. In March 2014, the National Education Association, the American Federation of Teachers, the Opportunity to Learn Campaign, and the Advancement Project jointly released a toolkit highlighting restorative approaches as a best practice and providing guidance to administrators and educators on implementing them. In order to keep ourselves and fellow students in school, we demand that restorative justice practices, as outlined in the "Restorative Practices: Fostering Healthy Relationships & Promoting Positive Discipline in Schools" toolkit, be implemented in our district.
    8 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Christy Broome-Hunt Picture
  • Demand an apology from Star Tribune
    My name is Zeam, and I am a transgender/gender non-conforming student who had to quit sports because of the lack of support within schools. I am not only saddened because I had to cut out an important aspect out of my high school career, but also because I feel as though I cannot escape harassment — now even just reading the Star Tribune. It was painful to be on a team where I was expected to be someone I’m not. From the gendered uniforms to the phrase used to rally the team, I felt like a soulless body replaced me every game I played in. That’s why I was so hurt when the Star Tribune on Sunday ran a full-page ad full of blatant discrimination, problematic language and harmful intention about transgender students. The ad tried to smear a proposal for the Minnesota State High School League that would ensure that transgender students can participate in sports and be athletes like everyone else. The ad perpetuates negative roles of female-bodied individuals as well as erases trans* identities and promotes discrimination. The group who paid for the ad has also personally attacked me as well as other students in fliers, printing our legal names next to our identities in red, and negatively describing our work for safer schools. The Star Tribune should not be affiliated with such harassment and a group promoting discrimination. The Star Tribune needs to discontinue the ad, issue an apology, and work on a story covering this topic from the perspective of trans* student athletes.
    3,201 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Zeam P. Picture
  • Show You Care
    I cannot express how much it means to know that there are people in this world who support one through life. As we grow older and prepare ourselves for the world after high school, we spend years through school figuring out who we are and everything about ourselves. Yet, when a teen is lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or any other LGBTQ* identity, it can feel immensely more complicated and scary. In serious cases, feelings of isolation and non-support can lead to tragic outcomes, with suicide being the 3rd leading cause of death in youth ages 10-24. We need to put a stop to this and ensure that all youth have an equal shot at success and a bright future. For this reason, this simple project has one goal: show teens everywhere, we do care! In the end, this can make all the difference.
    36 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Pat Cordova-Goff Picture
  • Costa Mesa High School ,Students Need Solutions: Adopt Restorative Practices
    In November 2013, Jewlyes Gutierrez, a transgender girl from California, was outrageously charged with assault for defending herself against bullying at school. A year earlier, Dynasty Young in Indiana was expelled for bringing a stun gun to school in self-defense after enduring months of harassment based on his sexual orientation and gender expression. Jewlyes, Dynasty, LGBTQ youth, and all students deserve better. Our district can -- and must -- take action now to make sure our students are never put in a similar position. We often hear about bullying in schools, but the anti-bullying and zero tolerance policies adopted in response pose just as much of a danger for LGBTQ youth of color. Together, hostile school environments and extreme disciplinary policies create a school-to-prison pipeline for youth of color, youth with disabilities, and LGBTQ youth, telling them that their lives are disposable and that simply trying to get an education carries a risk of jail time. LGBTQ youth make up just 5-7% of the youth population, but represent 15% of those in the juvenile justice system. We believe restorative justice practices are the best solution for school discipline problems involving bias-based bullying and harassment. Further, we believe that punitive exclusionary practices (like suspensions and expulsions) hurt all students' ability to succeed and achieve their academic goals and dreams. In January, the Obama administration released guidelines for improving school climate and discipline. Those guidelines recommend best practices like restorative approaches and condemn punitive policies and court referrals. It has been proven that alternative discipline with non-punitive approaches provides better student outcomes and keeps the student community together. In March 2014, the National Education Association, the American Federation of Teachers, the Opportunity to Learn Campaign, and the Advancement Project jointly released a toolkit highlighting restorative approaches as a best practice and providing guidance to administrators and educators on implementing them. In order to keep ourselves and fellow students in school, we demand that restorative justice practices, as outlined in the "Restorative Practices: Fostering Healthy Relationships & Promoting Positive Discipline in Schools" toolkit, be implemented in our district.
    24 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Chris Moncada Picture
  • Students Need Solutions: Adopt Restorative Practices
    In November 2013, Jewlyes Gutierrez, a transgender girl from California, was outrageously charged with assault for defending herself against bullying at school. A year earlier, Dynasty Young in Indiana was expelled for bringing a stun gun to school in self-defense after enduring months of harassment based on his sexual orientation and gender expression. Jewlyes, Dynasty, LGBTQ youth, and all students deserve better. Missouri can -- and must -- take action now to make sure our students are never put in a similar position. We often hear about bullying in schools, but the anti-bullying and zero tolerance policies adopted in response pose just as much of a danger for LGBTQ youth of color. Together, hostile school environments and extreme disciplinary policies create a school-to-prison pipeline for youth of color, youth with disabilities, and LGBTQ youth, telling them that their lives are disposable and that simply trying to get an education carries a risk of jail time. LGBTQ youth make up just 5-7% of the youth population, but represent 15% of those in the juvenile justice system. We believe restorative justice practices are the best solution for school discipline problems involving bias-based bullying and harassment. We can make this happen together by building a powerful student network to push back against school push out. Further, we believe that punitive exclusionary practices (like suspensions and expulsions) hurt all students' ability to succeed and achieve their academic goals and dreams. In January, the Obama administration released guidelines for improving school climate and discipline. Those guidelines recommend best practices like restorative approaches and condemn punitive policies and court referrals. It has been proven that alternative discipline with non-punitive approaches provides better student outcomes and keeps the student community together. In March 2014, the National Education Association, the American Federation of Teachers, the Opportunity to Learn Campaign, and the Advancement Project jointly released a toolkit highlighting restorative approaches as a best practice and providing guidance to administrators and educators on implementing them. In order to keep ourselves and fellow students in school, we demand that restorative justice practices, as outlined in the "Restorative Practices: Fostering Healthy Relationships & Promoting Positive Discipline in Schools" toolkit, be implemented in Missouri.
    53 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Ka'Milla McMiller
  • Breaking the Gender Binary at Graduation
    We had asked students from Capuchino, Penninsula, Mills, San Mateo High, Aragon, Burlingame High, and Hillsdale why this was important to them. These were their responses. "Students are not gender binary. In fact, they fall in many different places on a spectrum, especially in high school when teens are exploring where they fall on the gender identity spectrum. " "This tradition presents more of a sense of separation at graduation than it does unity, because it does not allow students who do not conform to the gender binary the comfort that they deserve. By giving all students the simple choice to wear either green or gold or even a combination of the two, the students are given more freedom to make a choice regarding their own graduation and are able to come together as a community through the availability of a choice. " "Students should not feel uncomfortable on the day they are recognized for graduating high school. If the student does not feel the gender color gown they are assigned is accurate or if they do not identify with either gender, they should not be forced to wear that color graduation gown. We need to change this style of deciding gown colors by gender because there are many students that may not be sure of their gender identity at this point in their life or have not told their families and friends yet. These students should not be forced to wear a color that labels them as strictly male or female. A last name or numbering off system of deciding gown color for graduation would alleviate the pressure of fitting a gender binary." "I find it profoundly strange how we are told that as students that we are all different and that is is good to be that. From what I have taken from my high school experience is that we shouldn't allow ourselves to be defined by those around us and that who we are is solely determined by us. Yet if I can’t be who I am at my school due to gender specific roles that the school places on us then why try? School by itself is a difficult thing and its even harder when being told who to be. It comes to a simple thing “Let me be me”." The reason we want this petition to be done is to end that gender binary system that schools in this district still have. There have been schools, such as Hillsdale, that have successfully been able to implement this into their school. This was not done without being given a reason to, a reason that revealed the urgency of this need for getting rid of the segregation. A few years ago, a transgender student who had not been out to his parents was unsure what robe to choose. He had decided to not go to graduation because of this issue that he was facing. The part that had gotten many students the most upset was the fact that this student was also valedictorian. Not only had he missed out on his graduation, he had missed out on his chance to make a speech as the representative for the class. We do not want this segregation to continue and to even create issues that escalate to students deciding that they can't go to graduation because of how uncomfortable they feel. We are making a stand together to speak out against this segregation and to make a change. We thank you for your consideration.
    175 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Aiden C.
  • Support all AVUHSD Students
    My name is Jazmine Lagunas Guerrero and I go to SOAR High School in Lancaster. I like that we value community and family here in the Antelope Valley. But people don't realize that living here can be really difficult for some of our youth. Youth who identify as LGBTQ, and especially young people who identify as transgender, face a lot of challenges to simply make it through each day here. Kids who are transgender have known on a deep level that their gender is different from the sex they were born with. It is a hard concept for many people to understand, which is OK. Still it's important for me, and I hope it's important for everyone else in our community, that all youth are given the opportunity to do well in school and are not singled out and excluded because of who they are. AB 1266, a law that went into effect in January, gives important guidance to schools so they can work with youth and families on a case-by-case basis to ensure every student can do well. It makes sure that all students, including transgender students, can use facilities and play on sports teams that match their identity. This law does not create co-ed bathrooms. Girls and boys bathrooms are separate, and this law doesn’t change that. If you live your life as a boy, you use the boy’s bathroom, and if you live your life as a girl you use the girl’s bathroom. Several school districts have already adopted new policies to support all students since AB 1266 was enacted last year. The California School Board Association has issued guidance for districts, encouraging them to adopt policies to ensure all youth can fully participate in school as themselves. LAUSD, the second largest district in the country, has had a policy in place for years, and no problems have ever arisen. Yet in the Antelope Valley, young people are struggling daily, with their education, health, and well-being at risk. At my high school, we all come to school to study and to learn. It doesn't matter to me if you're a boy or girl, transgender or not. Please support all students in our district, so that all Antelope Valley youth have a chance to do well in school and thrive.
    242 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Jazmine Lagunas Guerrero Picture
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