• Uphold Parkway Sex Ed
    In the Spring of 2016, the Parkway Board of Education voted to bring changes to the Sexual Education Curriculum to make it inclusive. But it is still under attack. The Parkway School Board now has a conservative majority. We must tell them that we NEED Sex Ed to keep us safe. Please sign to stand with Parkway Students.
    573 of 600 Signatures
    Created by Andrew Bennett Picture
  • CUSD: Gender-Neutral Dress Code
    The Clovis Unified School District's majority vote (4-3) refusing the adaptation of a gender-neutral dress code is illegal. Under the California Education Code (Ch. 2 Art. 3 Sec. 220), students are entitled to their right of not being subjected to "...discrimination on the basis of disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression...". Students, parents, and community members alike believe that the mindset during the implementation of the 1975 CUSD dress code does not reflect the mindset of 2016's society.
    3,789 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Rei Bioco Picture
  • Gender Equality for MHS
    Many student feel their gender doesn't categorize as male or female. These kids are often discriminated against or disregarded completely. This can create many issues for both the mental and physical health of the student. If we educate our school about non binary genders, it will help on the path to equality. Also, if we create a bathroom for non binary individuals, not only would it give them somewhere to use the restroom safely, it would create a better and more accepting environment in general.
    153 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Amber Gilson
  • Help Me Fight Against Schools Punishing People For Standing Up for What's Right
    Schools shouldn't punish students for standing up for justice. I was fighting for my civil rights and my rights as a human being and that is why the issues surrounding Ferguson and Racism itself are important to me. I believe the school also needs to adopt better alternatives other than suspension, expulsion, and detention because this is not helping people's education but set them up for things like incarceration and pushing them away from school. This is not the first time that people of color have been unfairly targeted. We have been punished more than most of the white kids have been even though we are not behaving worse. It is important to work together and find solutions and it has been proven that current punishments do not work. Not only am I targeted but people with disabilities, other people of color, people who Identify as trans*, and much more are affected by schools current practices. We need to work together.
    333 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Reimi Carter
  • North Carolina Students Need Solutions: Adopt Restorative Practices
    In November 2013, Jewlyes Gutierrez, a transgender girl from California, was outrageously charged with assault for defending herself against bullying at school. A year earlier, Dynasty Young in Indiana was expelled for bringing a stun gun to school in self-defense after enduring months of harassment based on his sexual orientation and gender expression. Jewlyes, Dynasty, LGBTQ youth, and all students deserve better. Our district can -- and must -- take action now to make sure our students are never put in a similar position. We often hear about bullying in schools, but the anti-bullying and zero tolerance policies adopted in response pose just as much of a danger for LGBTQ youth of color. Together, hostile school environments and extreme disciplinary policies create a school-to-prison pipeline for youth of color, youth with disabilities, and LGBTQ youth, telling them that their lives are disposable and that simply trying to get an education carries a risk of jail time. LGBTQ youth make up just 5-7% of the youth population, but represent 15% of those in the juvenile justice system. Exclusionary practices (like suspensions and expulsions) hurt all students' ability to succeed and achieve their academic goals and dreams. We believe restorative justice practices are the best solution for school discipline problems involving bias-based bullying and harassment, because they allow schools to address the root problems behind bullying and harmful behavior. In January, the Obama administration released guidelines for improving school climate and discipline. Those guidelines recommend best practices like restorative approaches and condemn punitive policies and court referrals. It has been proven that alternative discipline with non-punitive approaches provides better student outcomes and keeps the student community together. In March 2014, the National Education Association, the American Federation of Teachers, the Opportunity to Learn Campaign, and the Advancement Project jointly released a toolkit highlighting restorative approaches as a best practice and providing guidance to administrators and educators on implementing them. In order to keep ourselves and fellow students in school, we demand that restorative justice practices, as outlined in the "Restorative Practices: Fostering Healthy Relationships & Promoting Positive Discipline in Schools" toolkit, be implemented in our district.
    8 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Christy Broome-Hunt Picture
  • Demand an apology from Star Tribune
    My name is Zeam, and I am a transgender/gender non-conforming student who had to quit sports because of the lack of support within schools. I am not only saddened because I had to cut out an important aspect out of my high school career, but also because I feel as though I cannot escape harassment — now even just reading the Star Tribune. It was painful to be on a team where I was expected to be someone I’m not. From the gendered uniforms to the phrase used to rally the team, I felt like a soulless body replaced me every game I played in. That’s why I was so hurt when the Star Tribune on Sunday ran a full-page ad full of blatant discrimination, problematic language and harmful intention about transgender students. The ad tried to smear a proposal for the Minnesota State High School League that would ensure that transgender students can participate in sports and be athletes like everyone else. The ad perpetuates negative roles of female-bodied individuals as well as erases trans* identities and promotes discrimination. The group who paid for the ad has also personally attacked me as well as other students in fliers, printing our legal names next to our identities in red, and negatively describing our work for safer schools. The Star Tribune should not be affiliated with such harassment and a group promoting discrimination. The Star Tribune needs to discontinue the ad, issue an apology, and work on a story covering this topic from the perspective of trans* student athletes.
    3,200 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Zeam Porter Picture
  • To allow our GSA club to be in the Johnsonville High School Yearbook
    Because it really means alot to me..... i have put alot of time and effort getting sponsers and getting this club allowed at johnsonville high school and it just hurts when you cant even be in your own schools yearbook!
    28 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Taylor Bhattal Picture
  • Show You Care
    I cannot express how much it means to know that there are people in this world who support one through life. As we grow older and prepare ourselves for the world after high school, we spend years through school figuring out who we are and everything about ourselves. Yet, when a teen is lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or any other LGBTQ* identity, it can feel immensely more complicated and scary. In serious cases, feelings of isolation and non-support can lead to tragic outcomes, with suicide being the 3rd leading cause of death in youth ages 10-24. We need to put a stop to this and ensure that all youth have an equal shot at success and a bright future. For this reason, this simple project has one goal: show teens everywhere, we do care! In the end, this can make all the difference.
    36 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Pat Cordova-Goff Picture
  • Costa Mesa High School ,Students Need Solutions: Adopt Restorative Practices
    In November 2013, Jewlyes Gutierrez, a transgender girl from California, was outrageously charged with assault for defending herself against bullying at school. A year earlier, Dynasty Young in Indiana was expelled for bringing a stun gun to school in self-defense after enduring months of harassment based on his sexual orientation and gender expression. Jewlyes, Dynasty, LGBTQ youth, and all students deserve better. Our district can -- and must -- take action now to make sure our students are never put in a similar position. We often hear about bullying in schools, but the anti-bullying and zero tolerance policies adopted in response pose just as much of a danger for LGBTQ youth of color. Together, hostile school environments and extreme disciplinary policies create a school-to-prison pipeline for youth of color, youth with disabilities, and LGBTQ youth, telling them that their lives are disposable and that simply trying to get an education carries a risk of jail time. LGBTQ youth make up just 5-7% of the youth population, but represent 15% of those in the juvenile justice system. We believe restorative justice practices are the best solution for school discipline problems involving bias-based bullying and harassment. Further, we believe that punitive exclusionary practices (like suspensions and expulsions) hurt all students' ability to succeed and achieve their academic goals and dreams. In January, the Obama administration released guidelines for improving school climate and discipline. Those guidelines recommend best practices like restorative approaches and condemn punitive policies and court referrals. It has been proven that alternative discipline with non-punitive approaches provides better student outcomes and keeps the student community together. In March 2014, the National Education Association, the American Federation of Teachers, the Opportunity to Learn Campaign, and the Advancement Project jointly released a toolkit highlighting restorative approaches as a best practice and providing guidance to administrators and educators on implementing them. In order to keep ourselves and fellow students in school, we demand that restorative justice practices, as outlined in the "Restorative Practices: Fostering Healthy Relationships & Promoting Positive Discipline in Schools" toolkit, be implemented in our district.
    24 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Chris Moncada Picture
  • Students Need Solutions: Adopt Restorative Practices
    In November 2013, Jewlyes Gutierrez, a transgender girl from California, was outrageously charged with assault for defending herself against bullying at school. A year earlier, Dynasty Young in Indiana was expelled for bringing a stun gun to school in self-defense after enduring months of harassment based on his sexual orientation and gender expression. Jewlyes, Dynasty, LGBTQ youth, and all students deserve better. Missouri can -- and must -- take action now to make sure our students are never put in a similar position. We often hear about bullying in schools, but the anti-bullying and zero tolerance policies adopted in response pose just as much of a danger for LGBTQ youth of color. Together, hostile school environments and extreme disciplinary policies create a school-to-prison pipeline for youth of color, youth with disabilities, and LGBTQ youth, telling them that their lives are disposable and that simply trying to get an education carries a risk of jail time. LGBTQ youth make up just 5-7% of the youth population, but represent 15% of those in the juvenile justice system. We believe restorative justice practices are the best solution for school discipline problems involving bias-based bullying and harassment. We can make this happen together by building a powerful student network to push back against school push out. Further, we believe that punitive exclusionary practices (like suspensions and expulsions) hurt all students' ability to succeed and achieve their academic goals and dreams. In January, the Obama administration released guidelines for improving school climate and discipline. Those guidelines recommend best practices like restorative approaches and condemn punitive policies and court referrals. It has been proven that alternative discipline with non-punitive approaches provides better student outcomes and keeps the student community together. In March 2014, the National Education Association, the American Federation of Teachers, the Opportunity to Learn Campaign, and the Advancement Project jointly released a toolkit highlighting restorative approaches as a best practice and providing guidance to administrators and educators on implementing them. In order to keep ourselves and fellow students in school, we demand that restorative justice practices, as outlined in the "Restorative Practices: Fostering Healthy Relationships & Promoting Positive Discipline in Schools" toolkit, be implemented in Missouri.
    53 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Ka'Milla McMiller
  • Allow GSA a Place in the Clovis North High School Yearbook
    Without the proper publicity, teens who are struggling with their sexual and romantic orientations won't be able to find our club as easily. We're working very hard to educate students on the LGBT community so they can feel safe and protected, but my kids feel like they're being targeted by school officials. GSA should be extended the same rights as every other club, not singled out because of what we stand for.
    44 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Cassi Diamond Picture
  • Add Gender Identity / Expression to the NDO
    All students/faculty/staff should be able to bring their full-selves to work and class every day by adding this protected class we can further ensure this is the case.
    17 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Caleb-Michael Files Picture